Category Archives: Log home decorating

An A. E. Higgins Chandelier in the Palais Theatre – Lower Esplanade, St Kilda

An A. E. Higgins Chandelier in the Palais Theatre – Lower Esplanade, St Kilda

The Palais Theatre, on the corner of the Lower Esplanade and Cavell Street in the seaside Melbourne suburb of St Kilda, was constructed in 1927 as the Palais Pictures, a picture theatre, to a design by prominent Sydney based theatre and cinema architect, Henry E. White. It was built on leased Crown land for the American entrepreneurs, Herman, Harold and Leon Phillips, who had previously established Luna Park in 1912 and the St Kilda Palais de Danse in 1913.

The Palais Pictures building replaced an earlier Palais Pictures designed by American architect Walter Burley Griffin (1876 – 1937) which was commenced in 1920 and destroyed by fire in 1926, just before its opening. It was designed to seat up to 3000 patrons and incorporated generous backstage facilities and a broad proscenium. Like its predecessor, the form of the new Palais Pictures conformed to that of the adjacent Palais de Danse, with the adoption of a curved, aircraft hangar-type structure.

The Palais Theatre is a free-standing, rendered, concrete encased steel frame building, with brick infill walls. The roof is a two level, shallow-curved corrugated iron roof, supported on steel trusses. Extensive use was made of steel framing, with the dress circle cantilevered from a steel frame, to minimise the number of columns required in the auditorium.

The design of the Palais Theatre is highly eclectic in style, and reflects a wide range of influences, some relating to the local St Kilda context, others to broad developments in architectural thinking of the day, and still others that are specific to cinema and theatre design. The highly visible side and rear facades of the free-standing building have minimal decoration, placing emphasis on the front facade. Conceived as a signboard, the central section of this main facade incorporates a large descriptive sign on a curved, rendered parapet. Domed towers flank the facade in a similar manner to the Luna Park entrance and the Palais de Danse facade.

Wanting to convey a sense of modernity, Henry White stated that he adopted no particular style in the design of the Palais Pictures building. He used Baroque, Modern Gothic and Neoclassical elements to heighten the perceived emotional effect of the cinema interior on an audience. Henry White’s interest in Modern Gothic design was combined with a striking Spanish-Baroque influence in the detailing, leaving the interior described at times as Spanish, French and Oriental. The Palais Theatre has a large, double-height entrance foyer with giant order columns, and two sweeping staircases to the dress circle foyer above. Walls are decorated with a disc-like surface pattern and columns have a scagliola finish. Two open wells in the upper foyer, a rectangular one over the lower foyer and an elliptical one over the back stalls, are an important aspect of the design.

The Palais Theatre is one of the few theatres with a foyer in the true sense of the word. The Paris Opera House was the first theatre to include fireplaces on its landings. The French word for fire is “feu”, and it was this that led for the landings to be subsequently known as foyers. The Palais Theatre has two Rococo style fireplaces located on the first level foyer. They have imitation plaster logs that were fired by gas to create an atmosphere of cosy warmth for patrons. The internal early or original decorative scheme of the Palais Theatre, designed mainly by Melbourne firm A. E. Higgins, is still substantially intact. The interior of the Palais Theatre is adorned by a variety of lighting, including candelabras, wall lamps and illuminated glazed panels. The lighting is either part of the A. E. Higgins decorative scheme or is part of a suite of light fittings manufactured especially for the Palais Theatre by Victoria’s pre-eminent manufacturer of lighting and hardware, William Bedford Pty Ltd. Some of the William Bedford light fittings are now located off-site. A switchboard located in the dome originally controlled the lighting in the theatre. In addition to the light fittings, the building retains many other carefully resolved original or early design features including: illuminated glass directional signs to the ladies and gentlemen’s cloakrooms; illuminated exit signs; tip-up theatre seating, associated foot warmers and attendant piping; arm chair style seating and carved timber benches; wall-mounted usher’s seating; stage curtains and wall and door drapes; and moulded spotlight housings. The Palais Theatre also contains an array of original and early service equipment and some remnants of orchestra pit balustrading that contributes to an understanding of how the theatre originally operated. The carved benches located on the first floor foyer, made especially by a Melbourne furniture manufacturer, were created for the original Walter Burley Griffin building of 1920, which was far more Art Deco in style.

After World War II some alterations were made to the building to enable large live performances. The Palais Theatre subsequently became home to the Elizabethan Theatre Trust’s ballet and opera seasons, and home to the Melbourne Film Festival from 1962 to 1981. In 1973 the outdoor promenade to the upper foyer was infilled across the front facade, significantly altering the building’s external appearance. Affected by the opening of the Arts Centre theatres in the 1980s, the use of the Palais Theatre became sporadic, and it has been used largely as a live music venue since this time.

The Palais Theatre is of historical significance for its association with the development of St Kilda as an important seaside resort and as an integral part of the St Kilda foreshore entertainment complex. Its vast scale and solid construction reflect the confidence in the location and the medium of film, by the 1920s. The Palais Theatre is of historical significance for its continuous association with a major form of popular entertainment in the twentieth century. This includes its original association with American entrepreneurs, the Phillips brothers, and its continued operation through the 1960s-1980s when many other amusements in the vicinity were closed, demolished or burnt down.

Posted by raaen99 on 2012-07-31 10:27:30

Tagged: , Palais Theatre , Palais Pictures , Palais Picture Theatre , Picture Theatre , theatre , cinema , picture palace , 1920s , 20s , 1927 , Deco , Art Deco , Interwar architecture , interwar , architecture , architecturally designed , Henry E White , Henry White , commercial building , entertainment , movies , moving pictures , Herman Harold and Leon Phillips , Herman Harold & Leon Philips , Modern Gothic , Modern Gothic architecture , Modern Gothic Building , Spanish Mission , Spanish , Modern Baroque , Baroque Revival , Neoclassical Revival , Spanish Baroque , Spanish Baroque Revival , A E Higgins , Melbourne , Victoria , Australia , St Kilda , The Esplanade , Lower Esplanade , Cavell St , Cavell Street , Melbourne architecture , Melbourne Open House , MOH 2012 , Melbourne Open House 2012 , MOH , Open House , Open House 2012 , light , illumination , chandelier , glass , wrought iron , shade , light and shade

Dressing Mirror Lights in the Palais Theatre – Lower Esplanade, St Kilda

Dressing Mirror Lights in the Palais Theatre – Lower Esplanade, St Kilda

The Palais Theatre, on the corner of the Lower Esplanade and Cavell Street in the seaside Melbourne suburb of St Kilda, was constructed in 1927 as the Palais Pictures, a picture theatre, to a design by prominent Sydney based theatre and cinema architect, Henry E. White. It was built on leased Crown land for the American entrepreneurs, Herman, Harold and Leon Phillips, who had previously established Luna Park in 1912 and the St Kilda Palais de Danse in 1913.

The Palais Pictures building replaced an earlier Palais Pictures designed by American architect Walter Burley Griffin (1876 – 1937) which was commenced in 1920 and destroyed by fire in 1926, just before its opening. It was designed to seat up to 3000 patrons and incorporated generous backstage facilities and a broad proscenium. Like its predecessor, the form of the new Palais Pictures conformed to that of the adjacent Palais de Danse, with the adoption of a curved, aircraft hangar-type structure.

The Palais Theatre is a free-standing, rendered, concrete encased steel frame building, with brick infill walls. The roof is a two level, shallow-curved corrugated iron roof, supported on steel trusses. Extensive use was made of steel framing, with the dress circle cantilevered from a steel frame, to minimise the number of columns required in the auditorium.

The design of the Palais Theatre is highly eclectic in style, and reflects a wide range of influences, some relating to the local St Kilda context, others to broad developments in architectural thinking of the day, and still others that are specific to cinema and theatre design. The highly visible side and rear facades of the free-standing building have minimal decoration, placing emphasis on the front facade. Conceived as a signboard, the central section of this main facade incorporates a large descriptive sign on a curved, rendered parapet. Domed towers flank the facade in a similar manner to the Luna Park entrance and the Palais de Danse facade.

Wanting to convey a sense of modernity, Henry White stated that he adopted no particular style in the design of the Palais Pictures building. He used Baroque, Modern Gothic and Neoclassical elements to heighten the perceived emotional effect of the cinema interior on an audience. Henry White’s interest in Modern Gothic design was combined with a striking Spanish-Baroque influence in the detailing, leaving the interior described at times as Spanish, French and Oriental. The Palais Theatre has a large, double-height entrance foyer with giant order columns, and two sweeping staircases to the dress circle foyer above. Walls are decorated with a disc-like surface pattern and columns have a scagliola finish. Two open wells in the upper foyer, a rectangular one over the lower foyer and an elliptical one over the back stalls, are an important aspect of the design.

The Palais Theatre is one of the few theatres with a foyer in the true sense of the word. The Paris Opera House was the first theatre to include fireplaces on its landings. The French word for fire is “feu”, and it was this that led for the landings to be subsequently known as foyers. The Palais Theatre has two Rococo style fireplaces located on the first level foyer. They have imitation plaster logs that were fired by gas to create an atmosphere of cosy warmth for patrons. The internal early or original decorative scheme of the Palais Theatre, designed mainly by Melbourne firm A. E. Higgins, is still substantially intact. The interior of the Palais Theatre is adorned by a variety of lighting, including candelabras, wall lamps and illuminated glazed panels. The lighting is either part of the A. E. Higgins decorative scheme or is part of a suite of light fittings manufactured especially for the Palais Theatre by Victoria’s pre-eminent manufacturer of lighting and hardware, William Bedford Pty Ltd. Some of the William Bedford light fittings are now located off-site. A switchboard located in the dome originally controlled the lighting in the theatre. In addition to the light fittings, the building retains many other carefully resolved original or early design features including: illuminated glass directional signs to the ladies and gentlemen’s cloakrooms; illuminated exit signs; tip-up theatre seating, associated foot warmers and attendant piping; arm chair style seating and carved timber benches; wall-mounted usher’s seating; stage curtains and wall and door drapes; and moulded spotlight housings. The Palais Theatre also contains an array of original and early service equipment and some remnants of orchestra pit balustrading that contributes to an understanding of how the theatre originally operated. The carved benches located on the first floor foyer, made especially by a Melbourne furniture manufacturer, were created for the original Walter Burley Griffin building of 1920, which was far more Art Deco in style.

After World War II some alterations were made to the building to enable large live performances. The Palais Theatre subsequently became home to the Elizabethan Theatre Trust’s ballet and opera seasons, and home to the Melbourne Film Festival from 1962 to 1981. In 1973 the outdoor promenade to the upper foyer was infilled across the front facade, significantly altering the building’s external appearance. Affected by the opening of the Arts Centre theatres in the 1980s, the use of the Palais Theatre became sporadic, and it has been used largely as a live music venue since this time.

The Palais Theatre is of historical significance for its association with the development of St Kilda as an important seaside resort and as an integral part of the St Kilda foreshore entertainment complex. Its vast scale and solid construction reflect the confidence in the location and the medium of film, by the 1920s. The Palais Theatre is of historical significance for its continuous association with a major form of popular entertainment in the twentieth century. This includes its original association with American entrepreneurs, the Phillips brothers, and its continued operation through the 1960s-1980s when many other amusements in the vicinity were closed, demolished or burnt down.

Posted by raaen99 on 2012-07-31 10:31:03

Tagged: , Palais Theatre , Palais Pictures , Palais Picture Theatre , Picture Theatre , theatre , cinema , picture palace , 1920s , 20s , 1927 , Deco , Art Deco , Interwar architecture , interwar , architecture , architecturally designed , Henry E White , Henry White , commercial building , entertainment , movies , moving pictures , Herman Harold and Leon Phillips , Herman Harold & Leon Philips , Modern Gothic , Modern Gothic architecture , Modern Gothic Building , Spanish Mission , Spanish , Modern Baroque , Baroque Revival , Neoclassical Revival , Spanish Baroque , Spanish Baroque Revival , A E Higgins , Melbourne , Victoria , Australia , St Kilda , The Esplanade , Lower Esplanade , Cavell St , Cavell Street , Melbourne architecture , Melbourne Open House , MOH 2012 , Melbourne Open House 2012 , MOH , Open House , Open House 2012 , light , illumination

Dressing Mirror Lights in the Palais Theatre – Lower Esplanade, St Kilda

Dressing Mirror Lights in the Palais Theatre – Lower Esplanade, St Kilda

The Palais Theatre, on the corner of the Lower Esplanade and Cavell Street in the seaside Melbourne suburb of St Kilda, was constructed in 1927 as the Palais Pictures, a picture theatre, to a design by prominent Sydney based theatre and cinema architect, Henry E. White. It was built on leased Crown land for the American entrepreneurs, Herman, Harold and Leon Phillips, who had previously established Luna Park in 1912 and the St Kilda Palais de Danse in 1913.

The Palais Pictures building replaced an earlier Palais Pictures designed by American architect Walter Burley Griffin (1876 – 1937) which was commenced in 1920 and destroyed by fire in 1926, just before its opening. It was designed to seat up to 3000 patrons and incorporated generous backstage facilities and a broad proscenium. Like its predecessor, the form of the new Palais Pictures conformed to that of the adjacent Palais de Danse, with the adoption of a curved, aircraft hangar-type structure.

The Palais Theatre is a free-standing, rendered, concrete encased steel frame building, with brick infill walls. The roof is a two level, shallow-curved corrugated iron roof, supported on steel trusses. Extensive use was made of steel framing, with the dress circle cantilevered from a steel frame, to minimise the number of columns required in the auditorium.

The design of the Palais Theatre is highly eclectic in style, and reflects a wide range of influences, some relating to the local St Kilda context, others to broad developments in architectural thinking of the day, and still others that are specific to cinema and theatre design. The highly visible side and rear facades of the free-standing building have minimal decoration, placing emphasis on the front facade. Conceived as a signboard, the central section of this main facade incorporates a large descriptive sign on a curved, rendered parapet. Domed towers flank the facade in a similar manner to the Luna Park entrance and the Palais de Danse facade.

Wanting to convey a sense of modernity, Henry White stated that he adopted no particular style in the design of the Palais Pictures building. He used Baroque, Modern Gothic and Neoclassical elements to heighten the perceived emotional effect of the cinema interior on an audience. Henry White’s interest in Modern Gothic design was combined with a striking Spanish-Baroque influence in the detailing, leaving the interior described at times as Spanish, French and Oriental. The Palais Theatre has a large, double-height entrance foyer with giant order columns, and two sweeping staircases to the dress circle foyer above. Walls are decorated with a disc-like surface pattern and columns have a scagliola finish. Two open wells in the upper foyer, a rectangular one over the lower foyer and an elliptical one over the back stalls, are an important aspect of the design.

The Palais Theatre is one of the few theatres with a foyer in the true sense of the word. The Paris Opera House was the first theatre to include fireplaces on its landings. The French word for fire is “feu”, and it was this that led for the landings to be subsequently known as foyers. The Palais Theatre has two Rococo style fireplaces located on the first level foyer. They have imitation plaster logs that were fired by gas to create an atmosphere of cosy warmth for patrons. The internal early or original decorative scheme of the Palais Theatre, designed mainly by Melbourne firm A. E. Higgins, is still substantially intact. The interior of the Palais Theatre is adorned by a variety of lighting, including candelabras, wall lamps and illuminated glazed panels. The lighting is either part of the A. E. Higgins decorative scheme or is part of a suite of light fittings manufactured especially for the Palais Theatre by Victoria’s pre-eminent manufacturer of lighting and hardware, William Bedford Pty Ltd. Some of the William Bedford light fittings are now located off-site. A switchboard located in the dome originally controlled the lighting in the theatre. In addition to the light fittings, the building retains many other carefully resolved original or early design features including: illuminated glass directional signs to the ladies and gentlemen’s cloakrooms; illuminated exit signs; tip-up theatre seating, associated foot warmers and attendant piping; arm chair style seating and carved timber benches; wall-mounted usher’s seating; stage curtains and wall and door drapes; and moulded spotlight housings. The Palais Theatre also contains an array of original and early service equipment and some remnants of orchestra pit balustrading that contributes to an understanding of how the theatre originally operated. The carved benches located on the first floor foyer, made especially by a Melbourne furniture manufacturer, were created for the original Walter Burley Griffin building of 1920, which was far more Art Deco in style.

After World War II some alterations were made to the building to enable large live performances. The Palais Theatre subsequently became home to the Elizabethan Theatre Trust’s ballet and opera seasons, and home to the Melbourne Film Festival from 1962 to 1981. In 1973 the outdoor promenade to the upper foyer was infilled across the front facade, significantly altering the building’s external appearance. Affected by the opening of the Arts Centre theatres in the 1980s, the use of the Palais Theatre became sporadic, and it has been used largely as a live music venue since this time.

The Palais Theatre is of historical significance for its association with the development of St Kilda as an important seaside resort and as an integral part of the St Kilda foreshore entertainment complex. Its vast scale and solid construction reflect the confidence in the location and the medium of film, by the 1920s. The Palais Theatre is of historical significance for its continuous association with a major form of popular entertainment in the twentieth century. This includes its original association with American entrepreneurs, the Phillips brothers, and its continued operation through the 1960s-1980s when many other amusements in the vicinity were closed, demolished or burnt down.

Posted by raaen99 on 2012-07-31 10:30:56

Tagged: , Palais Theatre , Palais Pictures , Palais Picture Theatre , Picture Theatre , theatre , cinema , picture palace , 1920s , 20s , 1927 , Deco , Art Deco , Interwar architecture , interwar , architecture , architecturally designed , Henry E White , Henry White , commercial building , entertainment , movies , moving pictures , Herman Harold and Leon Phillips , Herman Harold & Leon Philips , Modern Gothic , Modern Gothic architecture , Modern Gothic Building , Spanish Mission , Spanish , Modern Baroque , Baroque Revival , Neoclassical Revival , Spanish Baroque , Spanish Baroque Revival , A E Higgins , Melbourne , Victoria , Australia , St Kilda , The Esplanade , Lower Esplanade , Cavell St , Cavell Street , Melbourne architecture , Melbourne Open House , MOH 2012 , Melbourne Open House 2012 , MOH , Open House , Open House 2012 , light , illumination

John Katrencik Sr. Abt 1954

John Katrencik Sr. Abt 1954

Slovak immigrant and coal miner Jan (John) Katrencik on his front porch in Hendersonville PA. Photo by Joe "Roscoe" Katrencik Sr.

VILLAGES
(as reprinted from the Fall, 1994 issue of Pittsburgh History magazine published by the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania)
by Joseph Katrencik

Vanovka, Slovakia
Vanovka is an agrarian village of about thirty to forty houses in northern Slovakia’s Orava Valley. The village is nestled in the heavily wooded foothills of the High Tatra range of the Carpathian Mountains. A generation ago all the houses were made of logs; now more than half have been replaced by stucco and masonry. Nearby, on a high rocky cliff above the river, stands the communist restored Oravsky Podzamok castle. The castle, first referenced in 1267, was built to administrate the area and protect the ancient trade route leading to the Wieliczka Salt Mine and Kracow, Poland – about fifty miles distant. Slovanic tribes first came to this area in the sixth century. Previously, the land saw habitation by Celts and Germanic tribes. Since then northern Slovakia has experienced peasant uprisings, and invasions by Swedes and Batu Khan’s Golden Horde. In 1683 the Polish armies of Jan Sobieski burned 25 Orava Valley villages while on their way to save Vienna from the Turks.*** For a thousand years, from 907 A.D, when Magyars defeated Svatopluk and destroyed the Moravian Empire, until 1918 Slovakia was part of Hungary and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries strengthened Magyarization polices resulted in arrests for speaking Slovak in public, elimination of Slovak institutions, and severe cultural restrictions coupled with economic deprivation. Today an estimated 35% of the world’s Slovaks live in the United States and Canada. At one point Cleveland Slovaks claimed to live in "the world’s largest Slovak city," and Pittsburgh followed close behind, or perhaps we have just been more humble.

John Katrencik leaves Vanovka for America
By the early 1900’s my grandfather John Katrencik and his brothers Stefan and Andre had all left the Slovak village of Vanovka and come to America. Vanovka neighbors, all of whom were related in some way, forewarned them of gangsters in New York and especially Chicago, and of Indians in the west.
John first sought out Slovak contacts in Cleveland, where he had arranged to board, in hopes that he would get a job in the steel mills. He arrived at the friend’s house tired and hungry. A woman spoke to him in Slovak, and served hot coffee and buttered thick bread, and from big kettles on the coal stove – kapusta and potatoes flavored with garlic. When he finished eating the woman said, "More?"
"No thank you," John politely lied.
"Then the rest goes to the pigs," she said.

Many years later as my grandmother Teresa Katrencik stirred a ham bone in a kettle of broth, she would often say, "If only we’d had this bone in Vanovka."

* * *
John and his first wife, Maria Jurovcikova
Steel mill work was too hot, so John left Cleveland to find work in western Pennsylvania coal mines. He also felt less homesick with Pennsylvania terrain similar to the Carpathian foothills of Vanovka. He dug coal and lived in company towns at Federal near Bridgeville, at Hackett near Finleyville, and finally settled in for a longer stay at Hazel Kirk, on Pigeon Creek, upstream from Monongahela City. The new village of Hazel Kirk was built in 1901 by the Kirk-Wood Company of Cleveland to house miners for Hazel Kirk No. 1 mine, which began operations the same year. John had married Maria Jurovcikova, who was also from Vanovka. In 1904 she bore him a son. However, in a few years John took his family and savings back to Vanovka. He returned alone to Hazel Kirk to earn more money to buy land in Europe, but in 1910 received word that his wife had suddenly died. She was twenty six years old. Their son was then raised in Vanovka by Maria’s parents until 1923 when he returned to America and his father. There is no photo of my grandfather’s first wife. Her only child has been dead for years; the only person in Vanovka who may have told me something about Maria Jurovcikova died in 1990. A tombstone marks Maria’s grave in Vanovka’s small crowded St. Wendolyn cemetery, and a rubbing of that tombstone is in my wallet.

* * *
John meets Teresa – Jan Misanik’s sister
In 1909 Slovak immigrant Jan Misanik was boarding and working in Hazel Kirk. He worked for the mine as a carpenter – making tool handles, wooden spragues, and repairing wooden pit cars. He found time to make furniture for relatives and friends, and carved his own violin. Jan sent money to Vanovka so that his twenty four year old sister Teresa Misanikova (my grandmother) could come to America. In Hazel Kirk she boarded with John and Mary Jurovcik of the Adam clan. To earn her keep she helped run a four room household with as many as ten boarders at time, in addition to five Jurovcik children.

Jednota, the Slovak fraternal lodge, held meetings at the school house in Hazel Kirk. Jan Misanik and cousin Mato Zemencik were members, along with John Katrencik, his brother Stefan, and cousin Andy Snovak. Friends mentioned to the widower John that Teresa was a hard worker and would make a deserving man happy. Though she was also from Vanovka, John Katrencik vaguely remembered her since she was 8 years younger.

Teresa however was infatuated with Mato, who had accompanied her to America. In a short time though, John and his friends convinced her that he could be a fine husband. On the day he proposed, he brought her smoked sausages. "I made these for you," he said, "from my pig that I slaughtered, to show I am a good provider."

Jan Misanik returns to Vanovka
John’s brothers had returned to Vanovka, but Teresa’s younger brother and sister arrived in Hazel Kirk from Europe. At the end of World War I, when travel was safe again, Teresa’s older brother Jan Misanik returned permanently to Vanovka. He married Suzanna Sopchakova and they lived in a typical Vanovka log house. The house was heated by a whitewashed clay stove whose smoke vented into the attic – where in good times sausages hung from the rafters. In 1932 Jan’s wife died giving birth to their fifth child, and he soon married his uncle’s widow, Rosalia Misanikova. She was ten years older than Jan, and according to his daughter Suzanna, she did an admirable job raising the young children. Jan was killed in 1959 – his son Wendo’s dog barked, frightening the family’s horse, which pinned him against the barn wall. Ironically, Jan’s father had died in 1940 from lingering injuries suffered when, at age ninety two, he tried to round up stampeding neighborhood cows. As his granddaughter, my grandmother, often said, "God knows your end from the beginning."

John and Teresa move from Hazel Kirk to Hendersonville
My grandparents John and Teresa Katrencik lived in Hazel Kirk until October, 1928. The miners in Hazel Kirk and Van Voohris had been on strike, and the family moved to the coal mining town of Hendersonville in Cecil Township, Washington County – a mile south of the Allegheny County line. The Henderson Coal Company had built the town around 1913, when the railroad line was completed. John and Teresa and children John Jr., Fred, Sophia, Rudolph and Joseph lived in a wooden framed, four room company house, and like those in Hazel Kirk, it had no electricity or indoor plumbing. Eldest son August continued to work and board in Pittsburgh while my grandfather dug coal in the Hendersonville mine with sons John and Fred. Daughter Marion was born in Hendersonville in 1930. Eventually August would return to Hendersonville and work in the mine, as did brothers Rudolph and Joe when they were old enough.

Jan Misanik’s descendants in Vanovka
Today in Vanovka, Slovakia Jan Misanik’s daughter Suzanna lives with her husband Tomas Jurovcik in her father’s old log house, next to the barn where he was killed. Across the street in a modern house live Suzanna’s son Stano and his family. Stano is a crane operator. With his father he raises pigs and chickens, and harvests hay, vegetables, fruit, garlic, caraway and poppyseed. The family sleeps on featherbeds stuffed by Suzanna. In the village streets one has to be careful not to step in goose droppings. In 1990 no one in the village had an automobile, though Stano once owned a Skoda but sold it when he went to Libya for construction work. Two cousins attend computer school, and come home in the evening to gather hay with hand made wooden rakes. On a utility pole next to the church cemetery is mounted one of many rusted loudspeakers- from which the Communist Party would broadcast daily news and information. In some Slovak villages the Nazis were the first to eliminate the town crier and his drum in favor of a loudspeaker system.

Hazel Kirk today
In Hazel Kirk, Pennsylvania there remain a few occupied houses, but my grandfather’s house is gone, along with the mine, most of the slate dump, and the school house where my aunts, uncles and father attended first grade. Few current maps show that Hazel Kirk exists. In nearby Van Voohris Misanik and Zemencik relatives tend gardens, can tomatoes and bake nut rolls for holidays. Down the road in Crackerjack lives Big Helen, daughter of John and Mary Jurovcik- who took my grandmother in as an immigrant boarder in 1909.

John and Teresa’s descendants in Hendersonville
Hendersonville, Pennsylvania still seems to survive in its own way, even without the coal mine which closed in the late 1940’s. Katrenciks still live there. There is a lower row of four company houses on what has been known as the "mine hill’ – it was the nearest of three village hills to the coal mine entrance. In the first house live John and Teresa Katrencik’s son Rudolph and his wife Grace. On the extra property next to his end house Uncle "Roe" grows tomatoes, onions, beans, peppers and garlic, and every spring and summer bordering areas are glorious with lilacs, gladioli and roses that he and his wife once donated to decorate St. Elizabeth Church – until the diocese closed the parish in 1993. From his teens until his retirement he had labored in coal mines and steel mills, and now hunts for arrowheads, bottles and Indian bones as he has done since childhood. He has mapped remnants of the nineteenth century Great Road which once led from Canonsburg to Pittsburgh. You can see where it used to be from his front porch. The second house has been empty since Uncle Fred Katrencik’s widow Irene died in January, 1994. If the house is not sold perhaps Fred’s son will again plant potatoes in the garden this summer. The third house has been abandoned since Aunt Grace’s Hungarian parents died years ago. The foundation is collapsing and the chimney is nearly gone. The weathered outhouse is still in back and the wreck of a powerboat of all things is parked where geese used to roam. The last company house in the row was once my grandparents’. It had been their home and
the family’s gathering place from 1928 until widowed Teresa Misanik Katrencik died in 1983 at the age of ninety seven. Now the house has an addition and aluminum siding. Teresa’s great granddaughter lives there with her husband and children. In the summer tomatoes and garlic grow in the garden, toys liter the walk, kids play in the street. From the long front porch you can look down the valley at the worn slate dump. You can see the Montour Hiking Trail – where the railroad tracks used to be, and imagine a steam locomotive pulling a long line of coal cars.
* * *

Posted by KatrencikPhotoArchives on 2006-09-25 13:32:11

Tagged: , Katrencik , coal , mine , miner , Jan , John , Slovak , immigrant , Hendersonville , PA , 1954

Irving Petite and his dog “Ralph”

Irving Petite and "Ralph", greeting us as we arrived at his Little Bear Retreat in our rental car (PT Cruiser).

The white dog (one of many castaways that Irving had rescued and kept), was named Ralph. When we asked why he named a girl dog, Ralph, Irving would laugh and say "Well her full name is Ralphine".

Irving Petite, author of best seller "Mr. B." (about a black bear cub he raised on Tiger Mountain), was one of my best friends for 40 years. My wife and I visited him at his homestead on Tiger Mountain near Issaquah and later at his Little Bear Retreat in Keller Washington.

Living on the Colville Indian Reservation, Irving donated bananas to the Indian children in the head start program there. The kids called him "the banana man" and he loved it. His personal needs and wants were few, but what he gave to others…..was much.

Oh. And if it looks as though his "yard" might have been messy and in constant disarray – – it was. He didn’t care and neither did we. He had books, magazines, letters, typewriters and notes scattered and piled in his cabin, yet he could put his hands on any given story or book without hesitation. He had his own way of organizing his "stuff".

Irving Petite 19 Oct 1920 – 27 NOV 2004

I was in high school when I first met Irving Petite. We stayed friends from the early 1960s to the day he died. I have most of the letter he sent through those many years. He was a wonderful human being and friend and I hope this photo set can bring a little of the "joy of knowing Irving Petite" to you all.

OldManTravels March 2009

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
This is the email I sent our kids and friends of ours on Friday December 10th, 2004, once we learned that Irving had passed away:

Family – –

We got some sad news today. Our dear friend Irving Petite has died. He was 84. A friend in Seattle sent us an Email with the news. I found the obituary clipping from the Seattle Times (copied below) on the internet.

I first met Irving when I was in high school. We shouldn’t have become friends. When he found out I ran a trapline up Issaquah Creek, he twisted up his face and said "Oh, that is awful". But somehow the way Irving said it (and meant it), was that trapping animals was awful to him, but that didn’t necessarily mean I was an "awful" person. In fact, we were to become really good friends.

I loved everything about the outdoors as did Irving, so it gradually became my habit to stop by his cabin on Tiger Mountain and talk, animals, plants, and on occasion people. My brother dated Irving’s neice for awhile. Irving’s brother (Paul) lived next door to him at the time on Tiger Mountain.

Our friendship never did have a gap. I wrote and visited Irving when I could, and he always wrote me.
I loved his sense of humor and his love of the natural world. Linda and I took each of the three kids out to see his animals as they were growing up. With Irving, that usually didn’t mean you had to go outside his cabin. Ducks, chickens, goats, and whatever, might wander through his open cabin door at will, and without fear.

He kept a table extending the entire length of his living room wall, covered and piled deep with letter, cards, photos, articles, books, magazines, manuscripts, and an old upright typewriter or two. As disorganized as the pile appeared, he could quickly find anything he wanted in the pile.

When Irving finally left Tiger Mountain and moved to his rustic cabin over on the San Poil River, near Keller, We often went to see him. We would always picnic and talk on a table outside his cabin. The doorless outhouse had a beautiful view.

His place in Keller, was called the Little Bear Retreat (influenced in part I think because of his best selling book from the 60s "Mr. B.".). I hadn’t heard from Irving in a couple of months, so I wrote him a long hand written letter on paper decorated with black bear prints. That would have been about the middle of November [2004]..

We got a nice letter back toward the end of November. He sent photos of our last visit to his place in Keller. Another photo showed a couple of friends cutting and splitting firewood for him for this coming winter. He said he was doing fine and that he sometimes fell behind on correspondence. He also said he was going to be writing a biography. In it, he said, would be a chapter on "friends" and he wanted us to know that we would certainly be included there.

His letter must have been very close to the day he died in his sleep (November 27th according to the Seattle Times clipping).

Irving was and will be a positive influence on my life. He was a wonderful man.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
This is Irving Petite’s obituary from the Seattle Times, mailed to us by a friend:

Wednesday, December 08, 2004 – Page updated at 12:00 A.M.

Writer Irving Petite, 84, was the "Issaquah Thoreau"

By Kristina Shevory
Seattle Times Eastside reporter

THE SEATTLE TIMES

Irving Petite, seen in 1965, taught his nieces and nephews about local animals, which sometimes made their way into his home.

Irving Lawrence Petite loved animals. When one of his 12 goats was born with a hole in its heart and needed care, he moved the goat into his cabin on Tiger Mountain.

But then the other goats became jealous, so he moved them inside, too. Soon it was so crowded that Mr. Petite moved out of the house and into his shed.

His family and friends say his love of nature and animals is one of the traits they will most remember.

To the public, Mr. Petite was more widely known as the "Issaquah Thoreau," a freelance writer for The Seattle Times who lived a simple life on his rural Eastside ranch and penned five books, including "Life on Tiger Mountain" and "Mister B," a national best seller about raising an orphaned bear cub.

Mr. Petite died in his sleep Nov. 27 in Keller, a town on the Colville Indian Reservation in Ferry County. He was 84.

"Materialism meant absolutely nothing to him," said his nephew Randall Petite of Sumner. "He just needed the rain off his head, a sharp ax to split wood and a little bit of transportation."

Mr. Petite was born Oct. 19, 1920, in Gresham, Ore. After his family moved to Seattle, he graduated from Garfield High School and studied journalism at the University of Washington for three years.

Instead of waiting another year to graduate, Mr. Petite and a friend, Bill McCauley, pooled their money in 1941 and bought 165 acres at the base of Tiger Mountain for $10 an acre. They built a cabin on the land and lived there together for decades.

When Mr. Petite moved to the ranch, he took along only two things: a typewriter and a copy of Henry David Thoreau’s "Walden."

Over the next 40 years, he wrote articles for The Seattle Times and five books, "Life on Tiger Mountain," "The Elderberry Tree," "Meander to Alaska," "Mister B" and "The Best Time of Year," about living simply and respecting the natural world.

Although his books and articles sold well, the royalties weren’t always enough. So he and McCauley made extra money clearing the nearby forests of dead trees and selling the logs as fence posts.

In 1984, Mr. Petite said the area had become "too civilized," so he sold his ranch and fled from the development that he believed was invading his land. At the time, he told a Seattle Times reporter that "there’s no breath here."

He moved to the Colville Indian Reservation, where he lived in a house on 80 acres.

Mr. Petite believed strongly in living a simple life and didn’t have a telephone, electricity or water in his house. When he died, he had eight typewriters and 5-foot-tall stacks of photographs and documents in his house, his family said.

Although Mr. Petite never married or had children of his own, he enjoyed spending time with children. He taught his eight nieces and nephews about local animals and plants, and entertained them with the wild deer, mink and goats who lived with him, his family said.

Randall Petite said he remembers playing with the bear cub Mr. Petite was raising, and seeing a deer sitting on his uncle’s living-room couch.

Every week, Mr. Petite took large boxes of bananas to children in the local Head Start program on the reservation, said Mary Broughton Ross, the postmaster in Keller. Over the years, he spent an estimated $10,000 on bananas.

In addition to his nephew, Mr. Petite is survived by two brothers, Marvin Petite of Belfair, Mason County, and Paul Petite of West Seattle; and seven other nieces and nephews in Seattle and Kodiak, Alaska.

Posted by oldmantravels on 2007-09-01 16:48:12

Tagged: , Irving Petite , author Mr. B , black bear cub , raising a black bear , best seller Mr. B. , Tiger Mountain homestead , Tiger Mountain ranch , Issaquah , Keller , Little Bear Retreat , San Poil River cabin , Keller Washington , River ferry boat , Martha , Lake Roosevelt , Grand Coulee dam reservoir , peacock feathers , living off the grid , dogs , milk cows , peacocks , poetry , poems , Colville Indian Reservation

A Corinthian Column in the Palais Theatre Foyer – Lower Esplanade, St Kilda

A Corinthian Column in the Palais Theatre Foyer – Lower Esplanade, St Kilda

The Palais Theatre, on the corner of the Lower Esplanade and Cavell Street in the seaside Melbourne suburb of St Kilda, was constructed in 1927 as the Palais Pictures, a picture theatre, to a design by prominent Sydney based theatre and cinema architect, Henry E. White. It was built on leased Crown land for the American entrepreneurs, Herman, Harold and Leon Phillips, who had previously established Luna Park in 1912 and the St Kilda Palais de Danse in 1913.

The Palais Pictures building replaced an earlier Palais Pictures designed by American architect Walter Burley Griffin (1876 – 1937) which was commenced in 1920 and destroyed by fire in 1926, just before its opening. It was designed to seat up to 3000 patrons and incorporated generous backstage facilities and a broad proscenium. Like its predecessor, the form of the new Palais Pictures conformed to that of the adjacent Palais de Danse, with the adoption of a curved, aircraft hangar-type structure.

The Palais Theatre is a free-standing, rendered, concrete encased steel frame building, with brick infill walls. The roof is a two level, shallow-curved corrugated iron roof, supported on steel trusses. Extensive use was made of steel framing, with the dress circle cantilevered from a steel frame, to minimise the number of columns required in the auditorium.

The design of the Palais Theatre is highly eclectic in style, and reflects a wide range of influences, some relating to the local St Kilda context, others to broad developments in architectural thinking of the day, and still others that are specific to cinema and theatre design. The highly visible side and rear facades of the free-standing building have minimal decoration, placing emphasis on the front facade. Conceived as a signboard, the central section of this main facade incorporates a large descriptive sign on a curved, rendered parapet. Domed towers flank the facade in a similar manner to the Luna Park entrance and the Palais de Danse facade.

Wanting to convey a sense of modernity, Henry White stated that he adopted no particular style in the design of the Palais Pictures building. He used Baroque, Modern Gothic and Neoclassical elements to heighten the perceived emotional effect of the cinema interior on an audience. Henry White’s interest in Modern Gothic design was combined with a striking Spanish-Baroque influence in the detailing, leaving the interior described at times as Spanish, French and Oriental. The Palais Theatre has a large, double-height entrance foyer with giant order columns, and two sweeping staircases to the dress circle foyer above. Walls are decorated with a disc-like surface pattern and columns have a scagliola finish. Two open wells in the upper foyer, a rectangular one over the lower foyer and an elliptical one over the back stalls, are an important aspect of the design.

The Palais Theatre is one of the few theatres with a foyer in the true sense of the word. The Paris Opera House was the first theatre to include fireplaces on its landings. The French word for fire is “feu”, and it was this that led for the landings to be subsequently known as foyers. The Palais Theatre has two Rococo style fireplaces located on the first level foyer. They have imitation plaster logs that were fired by gas to create an atmosphere of cosy warmth for patrons. The internal early or original decorative scheme of the Palais Theatre, designed mainly by Melbourne firm A. E. Higgins, is still substantially intact. The interior of the Palais Theatre is adorned by a variety of lighting, including candelabras, wall lamps and illuminated glazed panels. The lighting is either part of the A. E. Higgins decorative scheme or is part of a suite of light fittings manufactured especially for the Palais Theatre by Victoria’s pre-eminent manufacturer of lighting and hardware, William Bedford Pty Ltd. Some of the William Bedford light fittings are now located off-site. A switchboard located in the dome originally controlled the lighting in the theatre. In addition to the light fittings, the building retains many other carefully resolved original or early design features including: illuminated glass directional signs to the ladies and gentlemen’s cloakrooms; illuminated exit signs; tip-up theatre seating, associated foot warmers and attendant piping; arm chair style seating and carved timber benches; wall-mounted usher’s seating; stage curtains and wall and door drapes; and moulded spotlight housings. The Palais Theatre also contains an array of original and early service equipment and some remnants of orchestra pit balustrading that contributes to an understanding of how the theatre originally operated. The carved benches located on the first floor foyer, made especially by a Melbourne furniture manufacturer, were created for the original Walter Burley Griffin building of 1920, which was far more Art Deco in style.

After World War II some alterations were made to the building to enable large live performances. The Palais Theatre subsequently became home to the Elizabethan Theatre Trust’s ballet and opera seasons, and home to the Melbourne Film Festival from 1962 to 1981. In 1973 the outdoor promenade to the upper foyer was infilled across the front facade, significantly altering the building’s external appearance. Affected by the opening of the Arts Centre theatres in the 1980s, the use of the Palais Theatre became sporadic, and it has been used largely as a live music venue since this time.

The Palais Theatre is of historical significance for its association with the development of St Kilda as an important seaside resort and as an integral part of the St Kilda foreshore entertainment complex. Its vast scale and solid construction reflect the confidence in the location and the medium of film, by the 1920s. The Palais Theatre is of historical significance for its continuous association with a major form of popular entertainment in the twentieth century. This includes its original association with American entrepreneurs, the Phillips brothers, and its continued operation through the 1960s-1980s when many other amusements in the vicinity were closed, demolished or burnt down.

Posted by raaen99 on 2012-07-31 10:26:34

Tagged: , Palais Theatre , Palais Pictures , Palais Picture Theatre , Picture Theatre , theatre , cinema , picture palace , 1920s , 20s , 1927 , Deco , Art Deco , Interwar architecture , interwar , architecture , architecturally designed , Henry E White , Henry White , commercial building , entertainment , movies , moving pictures , Herman Harold and Leon Phillips , Herman Harold & Leon Philips , Modern Gothic , Modern Gothic architecture , Modern Gothic Building , Spanish Mission , Spanish , Modern Baroque , Baroque Revival , Neoclassical Revival , Spanish Baroque , Spanish Baroque Revival , A E Higgins , Melbourne , Victoria , Australia , St Kilda , The Esplanade , Lower Esplanade , Cavell St , Cavell Street , Melbourne architecture , Melbourne Open House , MOH 2012 , Melbourne Open House 2012 , MOH , Open House , Open House 2012

Backstage at the Palais Theatre – Lower Esplanade, St Kilda

Backstage at the Palais Theatre – Lower Esplanade, St Kilda

The Palais Theatre, on the corner of the Lower Esplanade and Cavell Street in the seaside Melbourne suburb of St Kilda, was constructed in 1927 as the Palais Pictures, a picture theatre, to a design by prominent Sydney based theatre and cinema architect, Henry E. White. It was built on leased Crown land for the American entrepreneurs, Herman, Harold and Leon Phillips, who had previously established Luna Park in 1912 and the St Kilda Palais de Danse in 1913.

The Palais Pictures building replaced an earlier Palais Pictures designed by American architect Walter Burley Griffin (1876 – 1937) which was commenced in 1920 and destroyed by fire in 1926, just before its opening. It was designed to seat up to 3000 patrons and incorporated generous backstage facilities and a broad proscenium. Like its predecessor, the form of the new Palais Pictures conformed to that of the adjacent Palais de Danse, with the adoption of a curved, aircraft hangar-type structure.

The Palais Theatre is a free-standing, rendered, concrete encased steel frame building, with brick infill walls. The roof is a two level, shallow-curved corrugated iron roof, supported on steel trusses. Extensive use was made of steel framing, with the dress circle cantilevered from a steel frame, to minimise the number of columns required in the auditorium.

The design of the Palais Theatre is highly eclectic in style, and reflects a wide range of influences, some relating to the local St Kilda context, others to broad developments in architectural thinking of the day, and still others that are specific to cinema and theatre design. The highly visible side and rear facades of the free-standing building have minimal decoration, placing emphasis on the front facade. Conceived as a signboard, the central section of this main facade incorporates a large descriptive sign on a curved, rendered parapet. Domed towers flank the facade in a similar manner to the Luna Park entrance and the Palais de Danse facade.

Wanting to convey a sense of modernity, Henry White stated that he adopted no particular style in the design of the Palais Pictures building. He used Baroque, Modern Gothic and Neoclassical elements to heighten the perceived emotional effect of the cinema interior on an audience. Henry White’s interest in Modern Gothic design was combined with a striking Spanish-Baroque influence in the detailing, leaving the interior described at times as Spanish, French and Oriental. The Palais Theatre has a large, double-height entrance foyer with giant order columns, and two sweeping staircases to the dress circle foyer above. Walls are decorated with a disc-like surface pattern and columns have a scagliola finish. Two open wells in the upper foyer, a rectangular one over the lower foyer and an elliptical one over the back stalls, are an important aspect of the design.

The Palais Theatre is one of the few theatres with a foyer in the true sense of the word. The Paris Opera House was the first theatre to include fireplaces on its landings. The French word for fire is “feu”, and it was this that led for the landings to be subsequently known as foyers. The Palais Theatre has two Rococo style fireplaces located on the first level foyer. They have imitation plaster logs that were fired by gas to create an atmosphere of cosy warmth for patrons. The internal early or original decorative scheme of the Palais Theatre, designed mainly by Melbourne firm A. E. Higgins, is still substantially intact. The interior of the Palais Theatre is adorned by a variety of lighting, including candelabras, wall lamps and illuminated glazed panels. The lighting is either part of the A. E. Higgins decorative scheme or is part of a suite of light fittings manufactured especially for the Palais Theatre by Victoria’s pre-eminent manufacturer of lighting and hardware, William Bedford Pty Ltd. Some of the William Bedford light fittings are now located off-site. A switchboard located in the dome originally controlled the lighting in the theatre. In addition to the light fittings, the building retains many other carefully resolved original or early design features including: illuminated glass directional signs to the ladies and gentlemen’s cloakrooms; illuminated exit signs; tip-up theatre seating, associated foot warmers and attendant piping; arm chair style seating and carved timber benches; wall-mounted usher’s seating; stage curtains and wall and door drapes; and moulded spotlight housings. The Palais Theatre also contains an array of original and early service equipment and some remnants of orchestra pit balustrading that contributes to an understanding of how the theatre originally operated. The carved benches located on the first floor foyer, made especially by a Melbourne furniture manufacturer, were created for the original Walter Burley Griffin building of 1920, which was far more Art Deco in style.

After World War II some alterations were made to the building to enable large live performances. The Palais Theatre subsequently became home to the Elizabethan Theatre Trust’s ballet and opera seasons, and home to the Melbourne Film Festival from 1962 to 1981. In 1973 the outdoor promenade to the upper foyer was infilled across the front facade, significantly altering the building’s external appearance. Affected by the opening of the Arts Centre theatres in the 1980s, the use of the Palais Theatre became sporadic, and it has been used largely as a live music venue since this time.

The Palais Theatre is of historical significance for its association with the development of St Kilda as an important seaside resort and as an integral part of the St Kilda foreshore entertainment complex. Its vast scale and solid construction reflect the confidence in the location and the medium of film, by the 1920s. The Palais Theatre is of historical significance for its continuous association with a major form of popular entertainment in the twentieth century. This includes its original association with American entrepreneurs, the Phillips brothers, and its continued operation through the 1960s-1980s when many other amusements in the vicinity were closed, demolished or burnt down.

Posted by raaen99 on 2012-07-31 10:29:53

Tagged: , Palais Theatre , Palais Pictures , Palais Picture Theatre , Picture Theatre , theatre , cinema , picture palace , 1920s , 20s , 1927 , Deco , Art Deco , Interwar architecture , interwar , architecture , architecturally designed , Henry E White , Henry White , commercial building , entertainment , movies , moving pictures , Herman Harold and Leon Phillips , Herman Harold & Leon Philips , Modern Gothic , Modern Gothic architecture , Modern Gothic Building , Spanish Mission , Spanish , Modern Baroque , Baroque Revival , Neoclassical Revival , Spanish Baroque , Spanish Baroque Revival , A E Higgins , Melbourne , Victoria , Australia , St Kilda , The Esplanade , Lower Esplanade , Cavell St , Cavell Street , Melbourne architecture , Melbourne Open House , MOH 2012 , Melbourne Open House 2012 , MOH , Open House , Open House 2012

The Stalls of the Palais Theatre – Lower Esplanade, St Kilda

The Stalls of the Palais Theatre – Lower Esplanade, St Kilda

The Palais Theatre, on the corner of the Lower Esplanade and Cavell Street in the seaside Melbourne suburb of St Kilda, was constructed in 1927 as the Palais Pictures, a picture theatre, to a design by prominent Sydney based theatre and cinema architect, Henry E. White. It was built on leased Crown land for the American entrepreneurs, Herman, Harold and Leon Phillips, who had previously established Luna Park in 1912 and the St Kilda Palais de Danse in 1913.

The Palais Pictures building replaced an earlier Palais Pictures designed by American architect Walter Burley Griffin (1876 – 1937) which was commenced in 1920 and destroyed by fire in 1926, just before its opening. It was designed to seat up to 3000 patrons and incorporated generous backstage facilities and a broad proscenium. Like its predecessor, the form of the new Palais Pictures conformed to that of the adjacent Palais de Danse, with the adoption of a curved, aircraft hangar-type structure.

The Palais Theatre is a free-standing, rendered, concrete encased steel frame building, with brick infill walls. The roof is a two level, shallow-curved corrugated iron roof, supported on steel trusses. Extensive use was made of steel framing, with the dress circle cantilevered from a steel frame, to minimise the number of columns required in the auditorium.

The design of the Palais Theatre is highly eclectic in style, and reflects a wide range of influences, some relating to the local St Kilda context, others to broad developments in architectural thinking of the day, and still others that are specific to cinema and theatre design. The highly visible side and rear facades of the free-standing building have minimal decoration, placing emphasis on the front facade. Conceived as a signboard, the central section of this main facade incorporates a large descriptive sign on a curved, rendered parapet. Domed towers flank the facade in a similar manner to the Luna Park entrance and the Palais de Danse facade.

Wanting to convey a sense of modernity, Henry White stated that he adopted no particular style in the design of the Palais Pictures building. He used Baroque, Modern Gothic and Neoclassical elements to heighten the perceived emotional effect of the cinema interior on an audience. Henry White’s interest in Modern Gothic design was combined with a striking Spanish-Baroque influence in the detailing, leaving the interior described at times as Spanish, French and Oriental. The Palais Theatre has a large, double-height entrance foyer with giant order columns, and two sweeping staircases to the dress circle foyer above. Walls are decorated with a disc-like surface pattern and columns have a scagliola finish. Two open wells in the upper foyer, a rectangular one over the lower foyer and an elliptical one over the back stalls, are an important aspect of the design.

The Palais Theatre is one of the few theatres with a foyer in the true sense of the word. The Paris Opera House was the first theatre to include fireplaces on its landings. The French word for fire is “feu”, and it was this that led for the landings to be subsequently known as foyers. The Palais Theatre has two Rococo style fireplaces located on the first level foyer. They have imitation plaster logs that were fired by gas to create an atmosphere of cosy warmth for patrons. The internal early or original decorative scheme of the Palais Theatre, designed mainly by Melbourne firm A. E. Higgins, is still substantially intact. The interior of the Palais Theatre is adorned by a variety of lighting, including candelabras, wall lamps and illuminated glazed panels. The lighting is either part of the A. E. Higgins decorative scheme or is part of a suite of light fittings manufactured especially for the Palais Theatre by Victoria’s pre-eminent manufacturer of lighting and hardware, William Bedford Pty Ltd. Some of the William Bedford light fittings are now located off-site. A switchboard located in the dome originally controlled the lighting in the theatre. In addition to the light fittings, the building retains many other carefully resolved original or early design features including: illuminated glass directional signs to the ladies and gentlemen’s cloakrooms; illuminated exit signs; tip-up theatre seating, associated foot warmers and attendant piping; arm chair style seating and carved timber benches; wall-mounted usher’s seating; stage curtains and wall and door drapes; and moulded spotlight housings. The Palais Theatre also contains an array of original and early service equipment and some remnants of orchestra pit balustrading that contributes to an understanding of how the theatre originally operated. The carved benches located on the first floor foyer, made especially by a Melbourne furniture manufacturer, were created for the original Walter Burley Griffin building of 1920, which was far more Art Deco in style.

After World War II some alterations were made to the building to enable large live performances. The Palais Theatre subsequently became home to the Elizabethan Theatre Trust’s ballet and opera seasons, and home to the Melbourne Film Festival from 1962 to 1981. In 1973 the outdoor promenade to the upper foyer was infilled across the front facade, significantly altering the building’s external appearance. Affected by the opening of the Arts Centre theatres in the 1980s, the use of the Palais Theatre became sporadic, and it has been used largely as a live music venue since this time.

The Palais Theatre is of historical significance for its association with the development of St Kilda as an important seaside resort and as an integral part of the St Kilda foreshore entertainment complex. Its vast scale and solid construction reflect the confidence in the location and the medium of film, by the 1920s. The Palais Theatre is of historical significance for its continuous association with a major form of popular entertainment in the twentieth century. This includes its original association with American entrepreneurs, the Phillips brothers, and its continued operation through the 1960s-1980s when many other amusements in the vicinity were closed, demolished or burnt down.

Posted by raaen99 on 2012-07-31 10:28:55

Tagged: , Palais Theatre , Palais Pictures , Palais Picture Theatre , Picture Theatre , theatre , cinema , picture palace , 1920s , 20s , 1927 , Deco , Art Deco , Interwar architecture , interwar , architecture , architecturally designed , Henry E White , Henry White , commercial building , entertainment , movies , moving pictures , Herman Harold and Leon Phillips , Herman Harold & Leon Philips , Modern Gothic , Modern Gothic architecture , Modern Gothic Building , Spanish Mission , Spanish , Modern Baroque , Baroque Revival , Neoclassical Revival , Spanish Baroque , Spanish Baroque Revival , A E Higgins , Melbourne , Victoria , Australia , St Kilda , The Esplanade , Lower Esplanade , Cavell St , Cavell Street , Melbourne architecture , Melbourne Open House , MOH 2012 , Melbourne Open House 2012 , MOH , Open House , Open House 2012

Art Deco Bench on the First Floor Foyer of the Palais Theatre – Lower Esplanade, St Kilda

Art Deco Bench on the First Floor Foyer of the Palais Theatre – Lower Esplanade, St Kilda

The Palais Theatre, on the corner of the Lower Esplanade and Cavell Street in the seaside Melbourne suburb of St Kilda, was constructed in 1927 as the Palais Pictures, a picture theatre, to a design by prominent Sydney based theatre and cinema architect, Henry E. White. It was built on leased Crown land for the American entrepreneurs, Herman, Harold and Leon Phillips, who had previously established Luna Park in 1912 and the St Kilda Palais de Danse in 1913.

The Palais Pictures building replaced an earlier Palais Pictures designed by American architect Walter Burley Griffin (1876 – 1937) which was commenced in 1920 and destroyed by fire in 1926, just before its opening. It was designed to seat up to 3000 patrons and incorporated generous backstage facilities and a broad proscenium. Like its predecessor, the form of the new Palais Pictures conformed to that of the adjacent Palais de Danse, with the adoption of a curved, aircraft hangar-type structure.

The Palais Theatre is a free-standing, rendered, concrete encased steel frame building, with brick infill walls. The roof is a two level, shallow-curved corrugated iron roof, supported on steel trusses. Extensive use was made of steel framing, with the dress circle cantilevered from a steel frame, to minimise the number of columns required in the auditorium.

The design of the Palais Theatre is highly eclectic in style, and reflects a wide range of influences, some relating to the local St Kilda context, others to broad developments in architectural thinking of the day, and still others that are specific to cinema and theatre design. The highly visible side and rear facades of the free-standing building have minimal decoration, placing emphasis on the front facade. Conceived as a signboard, the central section of this main facade incorporates a large descriptive sign on a curved, rendered parapet. Domed towers flank the facade in a similar manner to the Luna Park entrance and the Palais de Danse facade.

Wanting to convey a sense of modernity, Henry White stated that he adopted no particular style in the design of the Palais Pictures building. He used Baroque, Modern Gothic and Neoclassical elements to heighten the perceived emotional effect of the cinema interior on an audience. Henry White’s interest in Modern Gothic design was combined with a striking Spanish-Baroque influence in the detailing, leaving the interior described at times as Spanish, French and Oriental. The Palais Theatre has a large, double-height entrance foyer with giant order columns, and two sweeping staircases to the dress circle foyer above. Walls are decorated with a disc-like surface pattern and columns have a scagliola finish. Two open wells in the upper foyer, a rectangular one over the lower foyer and an elliptical one over the back stalls, are an important aspect of the design.

The Palais Theatre is one of the few theatres with a foyer in the true sense of the word. The Paris Opera House was the first theatre to include fireplaces on its landings. The French word for fire is “feu”, and it was this that led for the landings to be subsequently known as foyers. The Palais Theatre has two Rococo style fireplaces located on the first level foyer. They have imitation plaster logs that were fired by gas to create an atmosphere of cosy warmth for patrons. The internal early or original decorative scheme of the Palais Theatre, designed mainly by Melbourne firm A. E. Higgins, is still substantially intact. The interior of the Palais Theatre is adorned by a variety of lighting, including candelabras, wall lamps and illuminated glazed panels. The lighting is either part of the A. E. Higgins decorative scheme or is part of a suite of light fittings manufactured especially for the Palais Theatre by Victoria’s pre-eminent manufacturer of lighting and hardware, William Bedford Pty Ltd. Some of the William Bedford light fittings are now located off-site. A switchboard located in the dome originally controlled the lighting in the theatre. In addition to the light fittings, the building retains many other carefully resolved original or early design features including: illuminated glass directional signs to the ladies and gentlemen’s cloakrooms; illuminated exit signs; tip-up theatre seating, associated foot warmers and attendant piping; arm chair style seating and carved timber benches; wall-mounted usher’s seating; stage curtains and wall and door drapes; and moulded spotlight housings. The Palais Theatre also contains an array of original and early service equipment and some remnants of orchestra pit balustrading that contributes to an understanding of how the theatre originally operated. The carved benches located on the first floor foyer, made especially by a Melbourne furniture manufacturer, were created for the original Walter Burley Griffin building of 1920, which was far more Art Deco in style.

After World War II some alterations were made to the building to enable large live performances. The Palais Theatre subsequently became home to the Elizabethan Theatre Trust’s ballet and opera seasons, and home to the Melbourne Film Festival from 1962 to 1981. In 1973 the outdoor promenade to the upper foyer was infilled across the front facade, significantly altering the building’s external appearance. Affected by the opening of the Arts Centre theatres in the 1980s, the use of the Palais Theatre became sporadic, and it has been used largely as a live music venue since this time.

The Palais Theatre is of historical significance for its association with the development of St Kilda as an important seaside resort and as an integral part of the St Kilda foreshore entertainment complex. Its vast scale and solid construction reflect the confidence in the location and the medium of film, by the 1920s. The Palais Theatre is of historical significance for its continuous association with a major form of popular entertainment in the twentieth century. This includes its original association with American entrepreneurs, the Phillips brothers, and its continued operation through the 1960s-1980s when many other amusements in the vicinity were closed, demolished or burnt down.

Posted by raaen99 on 2012-07-31 10:20:26

Tagged: , Palais Theatre , Palais Pictures , Palais Picture Theatre , Picture Theatre , theatre , cinema , picture palace , 1920s , 20s , 1927 , Deco , Art Deco , Interwar architecture , interwar , architecture , architecturally designed , Henry E White , Henry White , commercial building , entertainment , movies , moving pictures , Herman Harold and Leon Phillips , Herman Harold & Leon Philips , Modern Gothic , Modern Gothic architecture , Modern Gothic Building , Spanish Mission , Spanish , Modern Baroque , Baroque Revival , Neoclassical Revival , Spanish Baroque , Spanish Baroque Revival , A E Higgins , Melbourne , Victoria , Australia , St Kilda , The Esplanade , Lower Esplanade , Cavell St , Cavell Street , Melbourne architecture , Melbourne Open House , MOH 2012 , Melbourne Open House 2012 , MOH , Open House , Open House 2012

Zen Bar Cabinet

Zen Bar Cabinet

Zen Bar Cabinet by Furntiure Resource.Zen Bar Cabinet is fun stylish and functional all in-one. This cabinet is comfortable and elegant to be placed in any room. Give your home a stylish contemporary feel with the Zen Bar Cabinet. The perfect bar cabinet for wine lovers everywhere! This versatile cabinet keeps your collection in order while adding sophisticated style to your dining room or cellar. This cabinet provides practical design options to match your interior decorating inspirations.

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Posted by dougbollinger on 2011-07-08 04:06:27

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